NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL ON CRIMINAL AND CIVIL CONFINEMENT

VOLUME 38

WINTER 2012

NUMBER 1

Foreword

ARTICLES

Reframing the Debate over Excessive Sentences to Move Beyond the Eighth Amendment
Brian J. Foley

A Proposed National Corrections College
James B. Jacobs & Kerry T. Cooperman

NEJCCC SCRIBES AWARD

It’s Time to Define High-Crime: Using Statistics in Court to Support an Officer’s Subjective “High-Crime Area” Designation
Hannah Rose Wisniewski

NOTES

The Potential for a Rise in Wrongful Removals and Detention Under the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Secure Communities Strategy
Laura Donohue

The Stolen Valor Conundrum: How to Honor the Military While Protecting Free Speech
Beth F. Lloyd-Jones

“You Have the Right to Remain Selectively Silent”: The Impractical Effect of Selective Invocation of the Right to Remain Silent
Gerardo Schiano

Exchanging a Kidney for Freedom: The Illegality of Conditioning Prison Releases on Organ Donations
Jennifer L. Visconti

 

VOLUME 38

SUMMER 2012

NUMBER 2

ARTICLES

Reflections on the Experience of Representing Organized Criminals
Honorable Gerald Alch

Civil RICO: How Ambiguity Allowed the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act to Expand Beyond its Intended Purpose
Lee Coppola & Nicholas DeMarco

The “Watchdog” Agency: Fighting Organized Crime on the Waterfront in New York and New Jersey
Michelle J. Demeri

Building a Case Against “Whitey”: A U.S. Attorney’s Tale from Inside James Bulger’s Prosecution
Donald K. Stern

CASE COMMENT

United States v. Gallaher: The Ninth Circuit’s Disingenuous Deference to Native American Sovereignty
Erin E. Odell

NOTES

Death is Different: Actual Innocence and Categorial Exclusion Claims Under the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act
Michael J. Berwanger

Allowing New Hampshire Police Officers to Prosecute: Concerns with the Practice and a Solution
Nikolas Frye

An Anomaly of the Law: Insufficient State Laws Fail to Protect Minor Victims of Sex Trafficking
Rebecca Carroll Sager

The Criminal Child and its Potential for Change: A Presumption in Favor of Rehabilitation in Sentencing Juvenile Offenders
Prateek Shukla